The Power of 24hrs

The Power of 24hrs

On November 13, 2008, Jamie Schanbaum, then 20 years old and enjoying the life of a typical college student, was feeling ill. Her symptoms were similar to those of the common flu but within 14 hours she was admitted to a hospital, in Austin, TX. Two days later, doctors explained that her lack of feeling in her extremities and discolored limbs were because she had contracted meningococcal disease.

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It’s never too late for a “professional renaissance”

It’s never too late for a “professional renaissance”

I remember the exact moment I figured out what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. I was in my sophomore high school chemistry class and my teacher said, “Do you see that book sitting on your desk in front of you?  It is moving right now – yep, all the molecules that make up that book are actually moving right now.” That concept blew my mind and I knew immediately I wanted to become a chemist and learn everything there was to know about molecules. 

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In my mind, I still run: Speaking out for all COPD patients

In my mind, I still run: Speaking out for all COPD patients

In my mind, I still run. Those simple six words were once shared by a close friend and fellow COPD patient. These words encompass everything I feel about having COPD. Such is the life of a COPD patient --- and there are more than 20 million of us in the United States.

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Mock blood, catapults, colored fire, and more for young scientists

Mock blood, catapults, colored fire, and more for young scientists

In high school, I loved science and knew that I wanted to make positive contributions in people’s lives. I went to college and majored in pre-med. All was well and good until I landed a co-op position at GSK. Suddenly I was conducting research, using technologies I had no idea existed, and pursuing a science career that wasn’t even on my radar when I thought about what I wanted to be when I grew up.

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From North Carolina to Brazil to Australia…the butterfly effect in action

From North Carolina to Brazil to Australia…the butterfly effect in action

The butterfly effect is a theory that one small action can create a ripple effect that brings about widespread change. The name stems from an MIT meteorologist who suggested that a massive storm might have its roots in the faraway flapping of a tiny butterfly's wings. This is how I think of GSK’s pharmaceutical manufacturing plant in Zebulon, North Carolina…a single tablet made on a production line here can be shipped out to patients in need around the world. 

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Hurricane Katrina showed us we can do better

Hurricane Katrina showed us we can do better

Ten years ago, Hurricane Katrina hit the US Gulf Coast, leaving more than 1,300 people dead, forcing one million people from their homes and leaving 372,000 children without schools. Nobody was prepared for such devastation. In fact, it took seven months to reunite the last family that was separated by the storm. It was a true wake-up call for disaster preparedness and disaster relief across the US. As a company, we realized there were things we could do to be better prepared.

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